FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Southwest Colorado’s Inaugural ‘Native Entrepreneurship’ Workshop

Please find the attached news release “Southwest Colorado’s Inaugural ‘Native Entrepreneurship’ Workshop”. The Southern Ute Indian Tribe is sharing this release in collaboration with the Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado.

 

Southwest Colorado’s Inaugural ‘Native Entrepreneurship’ Workshop

 

[Southern Ute Indian Reservation, Colorado, September 25, 2021] An exciting five-year collaboration to support small business growth and development began in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. The Southern Ute Tribe, Fort Lewis College Center for Innovation, and The Leeds School of Business Deming Center for Entrepreneurship at The University of Colorado Boulder hosted the inaugural business workshop called “Native Entrepreneurship “on September 24th and 25th.

 

Native Entrepreneurship was taught by Erick Mueller and Eric Burno, entrepreneurs and award-winning professors at the Leeds School of Business. This was a valuable program for both aspiring entrepreneurs and current small business owners. This course gave existing businesses a new perspective to stir creativity and explore new growth opportunities while providing the perfect primer for entrepreneurs navigating their way through the business start up process.

 

“The Southern Ute Indian Tribe was honored to host the Demystifying Entrepreneurship Conference and proud of the collaboration with the various entities who came together to support tribal entrepreneurs,” stated Chairman Melvin J. Baker. “The conference helped bridge the gap between a dream of small business development for members of our tribal community.”

 

Local entrepreneurs and innovators from the Ignacio area joined together at the Sky Ute Casino to turn their business ideas into reality or take their business concepts to the next level. The varied group included a sustainable plant pot for use in the rejuvenation of riverbeds, an electric vehicle charging experience, and a healing studio.

 

“I am grateful that these resources are available for our tribal community and the surrounding area. And that we can learn from experts in entrepreneurship,” says, a 2021 attendee.

 

Dedra White Eagle is excited to develop a few different ideas. One that she worked on during the workshop was an electric vehicle charging experience. Transforming this typically dull experience into one that shares Native American history and stories, is engaging and overall memorable. She shared, “The entire workshop was very valuable. I am a beginner in this entrepreneurship world and am thankful that I participated and learned these practical tools”

 

“What a special cohort of change-makers! I was inspired by the innovative ideas from all the attendees and especially impressed from the concepts developed by the Southern Ute Tribal members. It’s so exciting to launch this workshop series to contribute in elevating the local entrepreneurial ecosystem. I’m certain this cohort will help amplify the Native and surrounding community’s overall economic vitality. We can’t wait to return in 2022!”, shared Mueller.

 

This workshop will return to Ignacio, Colorado in the Spring of 2022. Receive updates about next year’s workshop.

 

This series of workshops is put on in partnership with CU’s Leeds School of Business  and is available in every major rural region in Colorado. The next Demystifying Workshop, Shore Up, is being offered in Vail, Colorado on October 8th and 9th. To register for this event, please visit https://www.vailvalleypartnership.com/event/shore-up-your-small-business/.

 

And to learn about all locations, visit : https://outreach.colorado.edu/program/demystifying-entrepreneurship-rural-colorado-workshop-series/.

 

Many thanks to those who made this event possible.

 

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Photo Courtesy of Erick Mueller

20211005 – Post Native Entrepreneurship 2021 RCWS Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: The rise in COVID positive cases prompts Tribe to move to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 2

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Melvin J. Baker, Chairman – 970.563.0100

Lindsay Box – 970.563.2313

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, October 1, 2021

 

The Rise in COVID Positive Cases Prompts Tribe to Move to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 2

Southern Ute Indian Reservation – Due to the rise in positive COVID-19 cases, in accordance with Tribal Council Resolution 2021-104, which adopted amended COVID-19 metrics, the Southern Ute Indian Tribal Council concurred with the Tribe’s Incident Management Team (IMT) recommendation to move to Phase II, “Safer at Home” Level 2.  Level 2 is a more restricted phase.  The change will be effective Saturday, October 2, 2021. Tribal Council and the IMT determined it was in the Tribe’s best interests to move to a more restrictive phase due to the new COVID cases, percent of positivity, and hospitalizations in the area.

 

“We have to do what is best to prioritize the health of the tribal membership and our tribal staff. Moving to Phase II, Level 2 now will help us return to our new normal in preparation for the holidays,” stated Chairman Melvin J. Baker.

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe will remain in Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 2 until further notice. The Tribal offices remain open to the public; however, all individuals are required to complete the tribal COVID screening process.

 

Below are what to expect when the Tribe moves to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 2.

 

The following activities are allowed:

  • Visit, care for, and assist a family member or friend
  • Go to the grocery store
  • Pick up medications or attend medical appointments
  • Go to school or buy educational supplies
  • Go to, or get things from, work
  • Go to a restaurant or store, provided all protective measures of the establishment are followed
  • Spend time outdoors to enjoy activities such as walking, hiking, playing, or picnicking at a park, etc.
  • Exercise indoors or outdoors provided capacity restrictions and protective measures are in place
  • Take your pets to veterinarian appointments

The following activities are strongly discouraged:

  • Leaving your home or visit with family members and friends if you are sick
  • Visiting loved ones who are not household members in the hospital, nursing home, or other residential care facility
  • Discontinuing the practice of social distancing, maintaining less than 6 feet of distance between you and non-household members when you go out

The following activity is required:

  • Using a face mask when required by public health order

Restrictions in Phase II, Level 2:

  • Personal gatherings are restricted to 20 individuals or less
  • Indoor gathering capacity is restricted to 50% of setting capacity and 75 maximum capacity
  • Outdoor gathering capacity is restricted to 50% of setting capacity and 100 maximum capacity

More information can be found on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s website and social media, in the Southern Ute Drum, and on the air at KSUT Tribal Radio. Individuals can also call the Southern Ute Indian Tribe by dialing 970.563.0100.

 

If you are sick, please self-isolate. If your symptoms begin to worsen, please call your primary healthcare provider or the Southern Ute Health Center at 970.563.4581. Do not arrive at your primary health care provider’s office without calling to notify the professionals of your symptoms.

 

Please continue to practice good hygiene by washing your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds. Cough and sneeze into the bend of your elbow or in a tissue, then throw the tissue away. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects in your home. Please continue to practice social distancing by staying 6 feet away from others. Stay connected with your loved ones and our tribal elders.

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20211001 – The Rise in COVID positive cases prompts the Tribe to move to Phase II Level 2 (FINAL)

20210929 – Revised SUIT Phase II, Level 2 Metrics & Restrictions

 

11JT Indian Policies and Procedures Meeting

Ignacio School District (11JT) Indian Policies & Procedures Meeting

The Ignacio School Board and Southern Ute Tribal Council would like to invite all parents of Native American students to the lgnacio School District’s Indian Policy and Procedures Meeting on Monday, October 18, 2021, at 5:30 p.m. in the Ignacio High School Auditorium.
Please see attached letter, agenda, and surveys attached.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum Opens New Exhibit: Inside Out 2.0: Native American Artists in the 21st Century

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Melvin J. Baker, Chairman – 970.563.0100

Lindsay J. Box, Communication Specialist – 970.563.2313

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 24, 2021

 

Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum Opens New Exhibit: Inside Out 2.0: Native American Artists in the 21st Century

 

Southern Ute Indian Reservation – The Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum announces the opening of Inside Out 2.0: Native American Artists in the 21st Century, which showcases local Native artists and their work, with pieces from their personal collections. Native art today reflects a full range of contemporary and traditional techniques, topics, and media. Native artists are a vital part of the contemporary art community and defy stereotypes about genocide by affirming identity through material and design. Their art symbolizes both personal and cultural meaning and supports resistance, survival, and sovereignty.

 

Featured artists in Inside Out 2.0: Native American Artists in the 21st Century are:

 

Oreland C. Joe Sr. was born in Shiprock, New Mexico, where he grew up on both the Navajo and Southern Ute reservations. His art is influences by his roots in the Four Coroners area of the U.S. Southwest combined with classical influences he gained while studying in France, Italy, and Japan. Mr. Joe works in a variety of media and is world-renowned for his stone and bronze sculpture.

 

Hyrum Joe was born on the Navajo Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico where he grew up in a home rich in Navajo language and culture. He became an artist after taking life-drawing classes at Mesa Community College in Mesa, Arizona and is now recognized for his unique style of portraiture. Mr. Joe exhibits regularly and has won awards including first place in the painting’s category at the 2019 Santa Fe Indian Market.

 

Norman Lansing, a Ute Mountain Ute, who was born in Towaoc, Colorado. Mr. Lansing works in all media and is best known for his sgraffito etchings on ceramic vases. He is also known for his acrylic paintings and pen and ink drawings. His art often explores the “relationship between man, animal, earth, and the spirits of all living entities” that are all needed to form a balanced universe.

 

Edward Burch Box, III, a Southern Ute Tribal Member, learned traditional Ute culture from his family, especially his grandfather, Edward B. Box, Sr. He practices traditional arts including beading, sewing, and crafting; his beadwork has won awards locally and nationally. Mr. Box’s creativity sparks through his beadwork and sewing which he does to represent traditional Ute ways.

 

Lindsay J. Box is an enrolled member of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe and is also descended from the Ute Mountain Ute. Ms. Box upholds Ute traditions by doing beadwork, sewing, photography, and videography. She is inspired by her culture and family and prefers to work using more traditional techniques and practices, such as working only when feeling good and incorporating prayer into her work.

 

Elise Redd, an advocate for cultural arts and crafts, she is the daughter of Bonnie La Zelle Redd (Omaha) and Albert Gunn Redd (Southern Ute). She gained her love of art from her grandmother, mother, and aunt who made traditional clothing and beadwork, and her father who was an accomplished oil painter. In her own work, Ms. Redd often uses bright colors, batiks fabrics, and crystals. She enjoys teaching and is the mentor of Rhianna Carel, also exhibiting in Inside Out 2.0.

 

Rhianna Carel is 16 years old, a member of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe, and a rising senior at Ignacio Senior High School. Rhianna’s parents are Marie Joy and Vern Carel and she has a younger sister. Ms. Carel has been beading for more than a year now and she has been inspired by designing her own earrings.

 

“On behalf of the Southern Ute Indian Tribal Council, I would like to invite you to the reopening of Inside Out 2.0: Native American Artists in the 21st Century. The exhibit features acclaimed enrolled Southern Ute tribal members who utilize their talent and skill to carry on the traditions of our Ute people,” shared Chairman Melvin J. Baker.

 

An opening reception will be held Friday, October 8, 2021 to honor the artists and kick off the installation. Due to COVID restrictions, the reception will be limited to invited guests only and a limited number of invitations will be delivered to the media.

 

However, all members of the media are invited to attend a pre-reception session to interview artists, learn more about the works on display, and take photographs. To RSVP, please contact Mr. Logan Gasdia, Marketing and Media Coordinator, at 970.563.2997 or via email at lgasdia@southernute-nsn.gov.

 

The mission of the Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum is to foster understanding of and respect for the unique origin, culture, language, history, and way of life of the Núuchiu (Ute People) and to advance people-to-people relations through inclusive and effective programming and services

 

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Photo Credit | Lindsay J. Box

20210920 – SUCCM Opens New Exhibit Inside Out 2.0 Native American Artists in the 21st Century (FINAL)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Southern Ute Indian Tribe Welcomes Establishment of Tribal Historic Preservation Office

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Melvin J. Baker, Chairman – 970.563.0100

Lindsay J. Box, Communication Specialist – 970.759.1494

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 10, 2021

 

Southern Ute Indian Tribe Welcomes Establishment of Tribal Historic  Preservation Office

Southern Ute Indian Reservation – The Southern Ute Tribal Council is happy to announce the identification of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO). The National Park Service formally approved the Tribe’s plan to establish a THPO. The Tribe’s Cultural Preservation Department, Native American Graves & Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) staff will assume the responsibility of review pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act upon completion of the development of its THPO.

 

The Tribal THPO will assume the following functions: direct and conduct a comprehensive survey and maintain an inventory of historic and culturally significant properties on tribal lands, identify and nominate eligible properties to the National Register of Historic Places and otherwise administer applications for listing historic properties on the National Register, develop and implement a comprehensive, historic preservation plan covering historic, archeological, and traditional cultural properties on tribal lands, and advise and assist (where appropriate) Federal and State agencies and local governments in carrying out their historic preservation responsibilities, among others.

 

“The idea of a THPO predates the establishment of the Cultural Preservation Department and it is a momentous time to see the visions of our past Tribal leaders come to fruition,” stated Chairman Melvin J. Baker.

 

According to the congratulatory letter sent to the Tribe from the National Park Service, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe is the 203rd Tribe to assume such duties. The new responsibilities were previously that of the State Historic Preservation Officer. In 2006, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe along with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe signed the Process for Consultation, Transfer, and Reburial of Cultural Unidentifiable Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects Originating From Inadvertent Discoveries on Colorado State and Private Lands with the State of Colorado. This was one of the very first within Indian Country and had since helped strengthen the relationship between the Tribe and State, Local Government, and Federal Officials.

 

“Now, the Tribe can continue to protect and preserve all cultural resources that include culturally significant places and resources within the exterior boundaries of the Reservation, but with greater emphasis – guaranteeing their existence for future generations to carry on our Ute way of life,” shared Mr. Garrett Briggs, NAGPRA Coordinator.

 

The Tribe will also be eligible to apply for federal funding for the newly established THPO Office. The Tribe will not assume the responsibility for assisting in the certification of local governments and evaluation of Investment Tax Credits rehabilitation projects as authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act.

 

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Photo Credit | Lindsay J. Box

 

20210909 – Southern Ute Indian Tribe welcomes establishment of Tribal Historic (FINAL)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tribal Council approved return to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 1

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Melvin J. Baker, Chairman – 970.563.0100

Lindsay Box – 970.563.2313

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, August 26, 2021

 

Tribal Council approves return to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 1

 

Southern Ute Indian Reservation – In accordance with the tribal Resolution 2021-104 which adopted amended COVID-19 metrics, and due to the rise in data, the Southern Ute Indian Tribal Council approved moving to the more restricted Phase II, “Safer at Home” Level 1 Order effective on Friday, August 27, 2021. The Southern Ute Tribal Council, in consultation with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s Incident Management Team (IMT) determined it was in the Tribe’s best interests to move to a more restrictive phase due to the New COVID Cases, Percent of Positivity, and Hospitalizations in the area.

Tribal leadership continues to prioritize the health safety of the tribal membership, tribal staff, and our tribal community. “It is more important, now than ever, for everyone to follow the recommendations to keep our community safe,” stated Chairman Melvin J. Baker. “The Delta variant is more transmissible, and individuals can experience more severe symptoms. I encourage our community to consider getting a COVID-19 vaccine, and test frequently to help us identify positive cases – keeping our community safe. By following the COVID safety guidelines, getting vaccinated, and testing frequently we are protecting our Tribal Elders, our language and our culture.”

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe will remain in Phase II “Stay at Home”, Level 1 until further notice. The Tribal offices remain open to the public, however all individuals are required to complete the tribal COVID screening process.

Below are what to expect when the Tribe moves to Phase II “Safer at Home”, Level 1.

The following activities are allowed:

  • Visit, care for, and assist a family member or friend
  • Go to the grocery store
  • Pick up medications or attend medical appointments
  • Go to school or buy educational supplies
  • Go to, or get things from, work
  • Go to a restaurant or store, provided all protective measures of the establishment are followed
  • Spend time outdoors to enjoy activities such as walking, hiking, playing, or picnicking at a park, etc.
  • Exercise indoors or outdoors provided capacity restrictions and protective measures are in place
  • Take your pets to veterinarian appointments

The following activities are not allowed:

  • Do not leave your home or visit with family members and friends if you are sick
  • Do not visit loved ones who are not non-household members in the hospital, nursing home, or other residential care facility
  • Do not stop using a face mask or covering when you are leaving your home
  • Do not maintain less than 6 feet of distance between you and non-household members when you go out

Restrictions in Phase II, Level 1:

  • Personal gatherings are restricted to 30 individuals or less
  • Indoor capacity is restricted to 75% of setting capacity and 175 maximum capacity
  • Outdoor capacity is restricted to 75% of setting capacity and 200 maximum capacity

For more information, please visit the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s website and social media, in the Southern Ute Drum, and on the air at KSUT Tribal Radio. Individuals can also call the Southern Ute Indian Tribe by dialing 970.563.0100.

If you are sick, please self-isolate. If your symptoms begin to worsen, please call your primary healthcare provider or the Southern Ute Health Center at 970.563.4581. Do not arrive at your primary health care provider office without calling to notify the professionals of your symptoms.

Please continue to practice good hygiene by washing your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds, cough and sneeze into the bend of your elbow or in a tissue then throw the tissue away. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects in your home. Please continue to practice social distancing staying 6 feet away from others. Stay connected with your loved ones and our tribal elders.

 

Key Metrics and Restrictions for Phases of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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20210826 – Tribal Council approves return to Phase II Safer at Home Level 1 (Final)

 

08252021 – Amended Public Health Order – Safer At Home – Phase 2

20210825 – Revised SUIT Phase II, Level I Metrics & Restrictions

 

 

 

SUIT Proposed Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters & Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Procedures

Southern Ute Indian Tribe

Proposed Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters & Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Procedures

A 60-day public comment period on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s water quality standards and Clean Water Act section 401 certification procedures will be held from August 23 to October 22, 2021.

For all interested individuals, an online hearing regarding the Tribe’s Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification Procedures will be held on:

Thursday October 7, 2021 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

To attend the hearing, please register at https://bit.ly/3wnzxAb before the event.

To register for this event, open a new web browser and go to the above WebEx Events link then click on the “(Register)” link next to Event status. Prior to the WebEx Event, it is advisable to visit the following help site to test your browser and connection: https://bit.ly/3e7p7Ne. Should you have additional technical problems, please contact the SUSS helpdesk at 970-563-5050. To join using audio only call: 1-415-655-0003 and use audio access code: 145 895 0864.

The live online hearing will be recorded and posted on the Tribe’s website. The proposed water quality standards, 401 certification procedures, and related documents can be found on the Tribe’s website at https://southernute-nsn.gov/justice-and-regulatory/epd/public-comments/.

You can submit your comments by one of the following methods:
• E-mail: wqs@southernute-nsn.gov (Preferred Method)
• Mail: Water Quality Standards Committee, Environmental Programs Division, Southern Ute Indian Tribe, P.O. Box 737 #81, 71 Mike Frost Way, Ignacio, Colorado 81137.

SUIT WQS comment period announcement

SUIT WQS quick notes

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Southern Ute Indian Tribe moves to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor” and Reopens Tribal Operations

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Melvin J. Baker, Chairman – 970.563.0100

Lindsay Box – 970.563.2313

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, August 3, 2021

 

Southern Ute Indian Tribe moves to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor” and Reopens Tribal Operations

 

Southern Ute Indian Reservation – On Friday, July 30, 2021 the Southern Ute Tribal Council, in consultation with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s Incident Management Team (IMT), approved Resolution 2021-104, which amended the Tribe-wide Recovery Plan adopted in March of this year. Modifications were made to the metrics and restrictions within approved Phases of the Recovery Plan.

The revisions to the key metrics and restrictions support a move to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor,” which is one phase below the Fully Open phase. The IMT will continue to monitor the data closely and provide the tribal leadership with the most up-to-date information in an effort to support the tribal reopening while prioritizing the health and safety of the tribal membership, employees, and visitors. The following graphic outlines the Key Metrics and Restrictions to be followed during each of the Phases.

Effective Monday, August 9, 2021, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe will move to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor”. The Tribal offices will open to the public, employees, and visitors, all of whom will be required to follow COVID-19 health safety guidelines.

Below are examples of capacity restrictions when the Tribe moves to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor”.

  • Personal gatherings are restricted to no greater than 125 persons.
  • Indoor capacity is permitted up to 100% and 500 maximum capacity
  • Outdoor capacity is permitted up to 100% and 500 maximum capacity

More information can be found on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s website and social media, in the Southern Ute Drum, and on the air at KSUT Tribal Radio. Individuals can also call the Southern Ute Indian Tribe directly at (970) 563.0100 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

If you are sick, please self-isolate. If your symptoms begin to worsen, please call your primary healthcare provider or the Southern Ute Health Center at 970.563.4581. Do not arrive at your primary health care provider office without calling to notify the professionals of your symptoms.

Please continue to practice good hygiene by washing your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds, cough and sneeze into the bend of your elbow or in a tissue then throw the tissue away. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects in your home or workplace. Please continue to practice social distancing staying 6 feet away from others. Stay connected with your loved ones and our tribal elders.

 

Key Metrics and Restrictions for Phases of the COVID-19 Pandemic

20210803 – Southern Ute Indian Tribe moves to Phase III “Protect Our Neighbor” and Reopens Tribal Operations (Final)

20210803 – Revised SUIT Phase I Metrics & Restrictions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: North Cinder Butte Area Fires – 6.20.2021 2100 Update

For IMMEDIATE Release, June 20, 2021, 2100 PRESS RELEASE

 

Suppression Efforts Continue on the Dry Gulch Area Fires

 

Durango, CO – Durango Interagency Coordinating Group (DICG) Media Contact:  Scot Davis

Title:                                  DICG PIO

Phone:                                 970-946-8979

Email:                                sdavis@lospinosfire.com

 

DRY GULCH FIRE AREA

Current Situational Update:

 

Since the dry lightning storm that hit the Fort Lewis Mesa area Friday afternoon and evening on June 18, 2021, 31 separate fires have been discovered. Of those, 9 are reported to be controlled/contained/out, and 10 controlled.

 

Currently, the largest fire is the Iron Springs Fire, 37 7.008, -108 4.506 (LAT/LON), which is 10 acres in size. Ground crews and a Type 2 helicopter have been working the fire, and spot fires, throughout the day.

 

No new fire starts on 6/19 and 6/20 Structures Threatened and Evacuations:

Currently, there are no structures threatened and no evacuation orders in place.

 

Current Apparatus:

 

1            Type 2 helicopter with a Helitack crew of 9,

1            Type II Interagency (IA) Crew,

8            Type 6 Engines, local and regional departments: Boulder (Left Hand), South Arkansas, Montrose, Loveland, Canon City, and Mancos

1            Tender, and

70          Personnel.

 

Operational Directive for 6/22/21:

 

Continue with suppression efforts on Iron Springs fire, and
Continue to work hotspots and watch for any “holdover” fires to

 

Fire Conditions for 6/22/21:

 

Weather will continue to be hot, dry and windy. High temperatures between 85 & 95 degrees, humidity below 14% after 1200, and wind gust up to 30 MPH. A Red Flag Warning is in effect for tomorrow. Thunderstorms with dry lightning are not expected tomorrow afternoon.

 

Smoke is visible from the CO Hwy 140 corridor. Individuals should avoid County Road 136 and the west end of County Road 100. Smoke will be visible to the local communities. For information related to air quality, please go to: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/wood- smoke-and-health

 

The public is encouraged:

 

To avoid areas with active fire and where fire operations are occurring,
Slow down and use caution while driving through, and in the area of, fire operations,
Continue to observe Stage 1 Fire Restriction, and
Understand that the current weather conditions combined with extremely low fuel moisture content greatly increase the potential for fire starts and growth – please use caution with any activity that produces heat and

 

The cause of the Dry Gulch Fire Area is the result of the recent lightning storm. The Tribe is coordinating with local agencies to ensure the safety of the public and to minimize the impact of the fire. The Tribe is also working with oil and gas operators in the area to shut-in facilities in the vicinity of the fire to mitigate any potential impact from those operators to first responder’s ability to contain the fire.

 

As a reminder, Stage 1 fire restrictions were enacted for Southern Ute Indian Reservation on Wednesday, June 16, 2021 and will remain in effect until conditions improve.

 

Stage I Fire Restrictions prohibits acts for the general public, commercial operators and industrial oil and gas operators performing work on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

 

STAGE I Fire Restrictions General Public:

 

Prohibited acts:

 

 

 

OPEN BURNING. Burning of trash and/or yard waste is

 

AGRICULTURAL BURNING. Burning of crop land, fields, rangeland, debris burning, slash piles, prescribed burning and weed burning are

 

CAMP FIRES. Building, maintaining or using a warming fire or campfire outside of officially designated or developed camp sites is prohibited. The fire restrictions do not include charcoal fires (in suitable containers) for barbeques or fires for sweat ceremonies, however, such fires are not to be left unattended and are to be fully extinguished after

 

Possession, discharging or use of any type or fireworks is prohibited.

 

Commercial and Industrial restrictions can be obtained from the BIA Fire Office at 575 County Road 517 or by calling (970) 563-4571.

 

Anyone violating the provisions of this fire ban may be subject to prosecution outlined in the Southern Ute Indian Criminal Code.

 

For more information on the North Cinder Butte Area Fires, please visit the Southern Ute Indian Tribe website, and follow the Southern Ute Indian Tribe on social media.

 

To report fires contact:

 

DURANGO ZONE DISPATCH (970) 385-1324

 

For more info or to report Fire Restriction Violations contact:

 

BIA FIRE MANAGEMENT (970) 563-4571 OR SOUTHERN UTE POLICE DEPARTMENT (970) 563-4401

 

Durango Interagency Coordinating Group (DRCG) Information

 

 

 

The Durango Interagency Coordinating group has been established in 1990 to unite all local fire response agencies, local, state, and national agencies including: BLM. USFS, BIA, NPS, Colorado State, Montezuma, La Plata, Archuleta, San Juan (CO), Dolores and San Miguel Counties, and local fire departments within those counties. The DRCG is tasked to assess current wildfire conditions and release coordinated messages to inform and educate concerning fire danger and current fire restrictions. Wildfires do not know jurisdictional boundaries and therefore having a cooperative environment to collaborate on conditions and how best to approach fire safety and response.

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NCBAF_Press Release_06_21_21_2100

Photo Credit | Durango Interagency Coordinating Group